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books



  • How Jimi Hendrix’s London Years Changed Music

    A new book, at the 50th anniversary of the guitar master's death, takes Jimi Hendrix's leap from chitlin circuit sideman to London sensation as a turning point for rock music. 



  • ‘JFK,’ by Fredrik Logevall: An Excerpt

    Read an excerpt from Fredrik Logevall's new biography of John F. Kennedy touching on the collegiate Kennedy's observations of Europe as World War II began.



  • A New Theory of Western Civilization (Review)

    "The WEIRDest People in the World" is the latest addition to the Big History category. The outstanding feature of the genre is that it wrangles all of human existence into a volume or two, starting with the first hominids to rise up on their hind legs and concluding with us, cyborg-ish occupants of a networked globe.



  • The South’s Fight for White Supremacy

    by Jon Meacham

    Edward Alfred Pollard launched the "Lost Cause" mythology with an 1866 book whose legacy has endured as an emphatic defense of white supremacy.



  • Unearthing New Histories of Black Appalachia (Review)

    by Jillean McCommons

    Tension between Black and white memory of the founding of Liberia, South Carolina drives John M. Coggeshall’s study, which adds significant insight to the history of Black Appalachia.



  • The Never Trumpers Have Already Won

    by Samuel Moyn

    Never Trump's historic role turns out to be not among Republicans so far, but within a Democratic Party whose members have chosen to convert enemies into friends, setting up a guardrail against the capture of their party by the left.


  • How Britain and Churchill Repelled the Nazi War Machine (1940-1941)

    by Jeff Roquen

    In The Splendid and the Vile, Erik Larson has not only produced an engaging and timely portrait of the perilous period of when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany but has also illuminated how tragedy and loss can be turned into a triumph and justice through steadfast determination and solidarity of purpose.  



  • Celebrating 50 Years of Essence as a Black Women’s Archive

    by Jacinta R. Saffold

    "For the last 50 years, Essence Magazine has consistently found innovative approaches to archiving Black women’s lives by immortalizing our intellect, literature, and culture on glossy pages," writes Jacinta R. Saffold.