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World War 2


  • Remembering Soldier's Bravery at Iwo Jima, 75 Years Later

    by Jack H. Lucas

    "I had no way of knowing that in a matter of a few short hours I would make the most important decision of my life and in the lives of three members of my fire team. The choice would be mine: either I could die alone or all of us would die together."


  • 75 Years After the Dresden Bombings

    by Sinclair McKay

    History in Dresen is not an abstract academic pursuit; instead, it is palpable and passionate. It matters enormously. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the horror that made Dresden – deep in eastern Germany - a by-word for annihilation.



  • How two women pulled off a medieval manuscript heist in post-war Germany

    by Jennifer Bain

    After the Dresden bombings, the Soviet Army seized and inspected the surviving vault. The first bank official to enter the vault afterwards found it pillaged, with only one manuscript remaining. The bank could never confirm if the vault was emptied in an official capacity or if it was plundered.


  • A Courageous Catholic Voice Against Antisemitism

    by Stephen H. Norwood and Rafael Medoff

    As the harassment and beatings of Jews in the streets of Boston reached epidemic levels in 1943, one hundred Jewish boys and girls, ages 12 to 16, sent a poignant petition to the mayor. 


  • Poles Apart: Putin, Poland and the Nazi-Soviet Pact

    by Geoffrey Roberts

    As the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II approaches, two of that war’s main victims – Poland and Russia – are once again embroiled in a highly emotional dispute about its origins. At the heart of the matter is the perennial controversy about the Nazi-Soviet pact of 23 August 1939. 



  • Putin’s Big Historical Lie

    by Anne Applebaum

    In a series of comments in late December, the Russian president appeared to blame Poland for the outbreak of the Second World War.


  • Great Britain’s Secret Role in Prodding a Reluctant U.S. to Superpower Status

    by James Thornton Harris

    America’s rapid emergence as a global superpower after 1945 is the subject of Grand Improvisation: America Confronts the British Superpower 1945-1957. Author Derek Leebaert challenges the conventional wisdom that an exhausted Great Britain voluntarily “handed the baton” of world leadership to the U.S. after World War II. 


  • Why FDR Turned Away Jewish Students

    by Rafael Medoff

    American immigration policy was governed by a strict quota system, based on national origins. But the law contained three major exceptions: clergy, professors, and students could be admitted outside the quota restrictions.